Snow Photos

As some of you know here in Ohio we got a few inches of snow in the last few days. Here are some tips for taking pictures in the snow. Ill post some of my snow pictures later tonight :0)

Snow photography is a fun activity to try during the winter months. In this blog, I'll give you some tips for taking great pictures in the snow, while keeping your equipment warm and dry. Read on...maybe you will get a White Christmas this year to try out some of these techniques!

Before you venture out into the Winter Wonderland to take fantastic snow photos, you need to take a few precautions. First, wear clothing that will keep you warm and dry. Dress in layers, and wear warm socks and snow boots if possible. Also, consider picking up a pair of fingerless gloves to keep your hands warm but still allow you to adjust your camera settings. Your camera and equipment need to stay warm and dry, too. Let your camera adjust to the sudden temperature change from a warm house to the cold outside air. Take it outside in its case, then take it out of the case after a few minutes. Also, be sure your battery is fully charged, as camera batteries tend to run out of juice faster in cold weather. Watch where you are walking as you are shooting; a misstep in the snow can land you -- and your camera -- in a wet soggy mess.

Shooting in the Snow

Snow scenes are full of bright white color. Your camera will see this and will try to turn all the pure white into grey, leaving the resulting photo looking like a portrait of dirty snow. So, you have to trick your camera in order to take an accurate image of the snowy scene. Lower your ISO to 50 or 100, and open your lens up one or two f-stops more than the auto setting suggests. For example, on a bright and sunny day in the snow, set your camera to 1/1000 of a second shutter speed, f/8 aperture, and ISO at 50 or 100. Use the same settings for an overcast day, though the resulting photo will not be as bright because there is less available light. When shooting snow scenes at night, increase your shutter speed to about 5 seconds, and close down the lens to ISO 200 or 400. Set up a tripod, and use the self timer so you don't cause a blur when you push the button to take the photo. Adjust the shutter speed to make the photo lighter or darker (increase it for lighter photos; decrease it for darker photos).

Snow Photography Examples

After you return from shooting in the snow, put your camera back in its case and keep it outside for a few minutes, then bring it in. As it warms up, pour yourself a cup of hot chocolate and turn on your computer.

Transfer your photos

from your camera to your computer, sort through them to find the best ones, and open them up in your favorite

photo editing software

. Play around with the

brightness and contrast levels

, and add more red and yellow into the photos if they appear too blue or grey. Save a few different versions, and try a few in black and white. When you are finished editing, upload them to Stone Soup and let us see them!

This info was taken from Digipix!  Hope this helps!

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Penny Shurte

Penny Shurte is a freelance photographer out of Beavercreek, Ohio. She is an avid gardener, a lover of traveling, a wife, caregiver, a pet mom and a person that can make you smile. You just never know where you might find her or what she might be getting into and writing about.


Penny Shurte is a freelance photographer out of Beavercreek, Ohio. She is an avid gardener, a lover of traveling, a wife, caregiver, a pet mom and a person that can make you smile. You just never know where you might find her or what she might be getting into and writing about.